Thursday, September 5, 2013

Repainting the Last Supper from the Borghese Gallery in Rome, For the Jewish Jesus Exhibit, NY, NY










Study from Jacopo Bassono's The Last Supper (1542) Galleria Borghese, Rome / 1st Century Judean Context re-Painting by Rod Borghese 2013 for Jewish Jesus Exhibit in New York. Available Prints on Canvas please email rborghese@aol.com 

Wednesday, August 28, 2013

Tikkun Zyor / תיקון ציור Painting Repair - Jewish Jesus Exhibit, NY

Painting Repair ... Tikkun Zyor / תיקון ציור http://ktzat-ivrit.ulpan.com/2012/02/how-to-say-painting-and-drawing-in.html


Christ and the Doctors, or Yeshua with the Teachers in Judea, 8 AD
Repainting : A quick study from Albrecht Durer's "Christ among the Doctors"dating to 1506, now in the Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid, Spain. Based on Luke 2: 46-50 ..... "After three days they found him in the temple courts, sitting among the teachers, listening to them and asking them questions. 47 Everyone who heard him was amazed at his understanding and his answers. 48 When his parents saw him, they were astonished. His mother said to him, “Son, why have you treated us like this? Your father and I have been anxiously searching for you.”
49 “Why were you searching for me?” he asked. “Didn’t you know I had to be in my Father’s house?” 50 But they did not understand what he was saying to them."  
 For the Jewish Jesus Exhibit in New York

Wednesday, August 7, 2013

Artist Call : re-Painting a Jewish Jesus, Re-imagining Iconic Christian Renaissance and Medieval paintings in their 1st Century Judean and Galilean Context

Artist Call: Re-Painting a Jewish Jesus. (New York Gallery Exhibit, 2014-15) The idea is to take a Renaissance or Medieval painting of Jesus ie: Birth, Baptism, Last Supper, etc and repaint it in the Artists' own style but re-setting in its proper Judean/Galilean/Netzarim context. As examples.... I painted the following this morning from 1655 The Baptism of Christ by Bartolome Esteban Murillo  ie: painting Jesus as a Torah observant Jewish Rabbi. The idea for this exhibit comes from Bernard Starr, Author and Journalist in NY City, he is working on the venue and other details. If you are interested in more information or submitting your work for consideration please email :  RodBorghese@Gmail.com

Left: "The Baptism of Christ " Bartolome Esteban Murillo, 1655

Right: Yeshua after Ritual Immersion in the Jordan, Rod Borghese, 2013













Jewish Jesus Art Exhibit
Left: Oldest surviving panel icon of "Christ Pantocrator", encaustic on panel, c. 6th century.

Right: Yeshua haNeTzr, the Nazarene
wearing tallit and holding a Torah scroll, Rod Borghese 2013

Thursday, May 2, 2013

Jewish Meditation: A Practical Guide by Aryeh Kaplan




Students of mediation are usually surprised to discover that a Jewish mediation tradition exists and that it was an authentic and integral part of mainstream Judaism until the eighteenth century.
 
Jewish Meditation is a step-by-step introduction to meditation and the Jewish practice of meditation in particular. This practical guide covers such topics as mantra meditation, contemplation, and visualization within a Jewish context. It shows us how to use meditative techniques to enhance prayer using the traditional liturgy—the Amidah and the Shema. Through simple exercises and clear explanations of theory, Rabbi Kaplan gives us the tools to develop our spiritual potential through an authentically Jewish meditative practice.



Aryeh Kaplan, Orthodox rabbi and author of Meditation and the Bible (Weiser, 1978) and Meditation and Kabbalah (Weiser, 1981), shows that meditation is consistent with traditional Jewish thought and practice. He then presents a guide to a variety of meditative techniques: mantra meditation (with suggested phrases and Bible verses to use as mantras); contemplation; visualization; experiencing nothingness (which he does not recommend for beginners); conversing with God; and prayer. His instructions are clear and explicit, and his advice is informed and sound, advocating that a simple 20-minute-a-day program can indeed help make the practitioner a better person and a better Jew, and develop a closer relationship to God and things spiritual. 

Reviews

“The classic text for Jews who want to experience the meditative methods of their own spiritual tradition.”
—Daniel Goleman, author of The Meditative Mind
 
“[This is] the first book to read on the subject. It is a gentle, clear introduction and provides exercises and practices that can be used right away by any Jew who wants a deeper prayer experience.”
—Rodger Kamenetz, author of The Jew in the Lotus
 
“New and old davveners can learn from this sainted teacher how to deepen their holy processes . . . One can, with the help of God and the aid of this manual, tap into the Cosmic.”
—Zalman M. Schachter-Shalomi

“A guide to Jewish prayer and meditation that is both grounded in the tradition and genuinely mind-expanding. For anyone seeking to connect with the spiritual side of Judaism, this book is essential.”
—William Novak

“At a time when Jews are rediscovering their hunger for spirituality, Kaplan’s clear and comprehensive book could well be one of the most important Jewish books of our time.
—Harold S. Kushner, author of When Bad Things Happen to Good People

Lecha Dodi, Come my Beloved. O Bride, Shabbat Queen, now come !


Lcha Dodi (Hebrew: לכה דודי‎; also transliterated as Lecha Dodi, L'chah Dodi, Lekah Dodi, Lechah Dodi; Ashkenazic pronunciation: Lecho Dodi, Biblical: Lekhah Dhodhiy) is a Hebrew-language Jewish liturgical song recited Friday at dusk, usually atsundown, in synagogue to welcome Shabbat prior to the Maariv (evening services). It is part of the Kabbalat Shabbat ("acceptance of Sabbath").

Lekhah Dodi means "come my beloved," and is a request of a mysterious "beloved" that could mean either God or one's friend(s) to join together in welcoming Shabbat that is referred to as the "bride": likrat kallah ("to greet the [Shabbat] bride"). During the singing of the last verse, the entire congregation rises and turns to the open door, to greet "Queen Shabbat" as she arrives.


Come out my Beloved, the Bride to meet;
The inner light of Shabbat,  let us greet.
Come out my Beloved, the Bride to meet;
The inner light of Shabbat, let us greet.
"Observe" and "Remember" in a single word,
He caused us to hear, the One and Only Lord.
G-d is One and His Name is One,
For renown, for glory and in song.
Come out my Beloved, the Bride to meet;
The inner light of Shabbat, let us greet.
To welcome the Shabbat, let us progress,
For that is the source, from which to bless.
From the beginning, chosen before time,
Last in deed, but in thought - prime.
Come out my Beloved, the Bride to meet;
The inner light of Shabbat, let us greet.
Sanctuary of the King, city royal,
Arise, go out from amidst the turmoil.
In the vale of tears too long you have dwelt,
He will show you the compassion He has felt.
Come out my Beloved, the Bride to meet;
The inner light of Shabbat, let us greet.
Arise, now, shake off the dust,
Dress in your garments of splendor, my people,
By the hand of Jesse’s son of Bethlehem,
Redemption draws near to my soul.
Come out my Beloved, the Bride to meet;
The inner light of Shabbat, let us greet.
Wake up, wake up,
Your light has come, rise and shine.
Awaken, awaken; sing a melody,
The glory of G-d to be revealed upon thee.
Come out my Beloved, the Bride to meet;
The inner light of Shabbat, let us greet.
Be not ashamed, nor confounded,
Why are you downcast, why astounded?
In you, refuge for My poor people will be found,
The city will be rebuilt on its former mound.
Come out my Beloved, the Bride to meet;
The inner light of Shabbat, let us greet.
May your plunderers be treated the same way,
And all who would devour you be kept at bay.
Over you Your G-d will rejoice,
As a groom exults in his bride of choice.
Come out my Beloved, the Bride to meet;
The inner light of Shabbat, let us greet.
To right and left you'll spread abroad,
And the Eternal One you shall laud.
Through the man from Peretz's family,
We shall rejoice and sing happily.
Come out my Beloved, the Bride to meet;
The inner light of Shabbat, let us greet.
Come in peace, her Husband's crown of pride,
With song (on Festivals: rejoicing) and good cheer.
Among the faithful of the people so dear
Enter O Bride, enter O Bride;
O Bride, Shabbat Queen, now come here!
Come out my Beloved, the Bride to meet;
The inner light of Shabbat, let us greet.


Monday, April 1, 2013

The Panentheism of Baal Shem Tov, Rabbi Yisroel (Israel) ben Eliezer





“All that I have achieved,” the Baal Shem Tov once remarked, “I have achieved not through study, but through prayer”. Prayer, however, is not merely petitioning God to grant a request, nor even necessarily speaking to God, but rather (“cleaving”, dvekut)— the glorious feeling of ’Oneness with God Almighty’, the state of the soul wherein a man or woman gives up their consciousness of separate existence, and join their own selves to the Eternal Being of God Supreme. Such a state produces indescribable bliss, which is the foremost fruit of the true worship of God.





All matter is a manifestation of God - Since God is immanent in all things, all things must possess something good in which God manifests Himself as the source of good. For this reason, the Besht taught, every man must be considered good, and his sins must be explained, not condemned. One of his favorite sayings was that no man has sunk too low to be able to raise himself to God. Naturally, then, it was his chief endeavor to convince sinners that God stood as near to them as to the righteous, and that their misdeeds were chiefly the consequences of their folly. 

Whoever does not believe that God resides in all things, but separates God and them in his thoughts, has not the right conception of God. It is equally fallacious to think of a creation in time: creation, that is, God’s activity, has no end. God is ever active in the changes of nature: in fact, it is in these changes that God’s continuous creativeness consists.

The foundation-stone of Hasidism as laid by Besht is a strongly marked panentheistic conception of God. He declared the whole universe, mind and matter, to be a manifestation of the Divine Being; that this manifestation is not an emanation from God, as is the conception of the Kabbalah by Mitnagdim, for nothing can be separated from God: all things are rather forms in which God reveals Himself.

Since every act in life is a manifestation of God, and must perforce be divine, it is man’s duty so to live that the things called “earthly” may also become noble and pure, that is, divine

Friday, March 29, 2013

The Resurrection of Jesus: A Jewish Perspective


Pinchas Lapide wrote,

"When this scared, frightened band of the apostles which was just about to throw away everything in order to flee in despair to Galilee; when these peasants, shepherds, and fisherman, who betrayed and denied their master and then failed him miserably, suddenly could be changed overnight into a confident mission society, convinced of salvation and able to work with much more success after Easter than before Easter, then no vision or hallucination is sufficient to explain such a revolutionary transformation.

For a sect or school or an order, perhaps a single vision would have been sufficient – but not for a world religion which was able to conquer the Occident thanks to the Easter faith." (p 125) - Pinchas Lapide, 

Available here :  The Resurrection of Jesus, A Jewish Perspective

The Yoga of Jesus

In this remarkable book, Paramahansa Yogananda reveals the hidden yoga of the Gospels and confirms that Jesus, like the ancient sages and masters of the East, not only knew yoga but taught this universal science of God-realization to his closest disciples. Compiled from the author's highly praised two-volume work, The Second Coming of Christ: The Resurrection of the Christ Within You, this insightful and compact book transcends the centuries of dogma and misunderstanding that have obscured the original teachings of Jesus, showing that he taught a unifying path by which seekers of all faiths can enter the kingdom of God. 
Topics include: 
  •The lost years of Jesus in India 
  •The ancient science of meditation: how to become a Christ 
  •The true meaning of baptism. 
Available here :     The Yoga of Jesus